Meryl Streep Caricature Sketch

Today it’s all about the Queen of the cinema, Mrs. Meryl Streep.  She’s up for an Oscar for her role as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady.  It’s another movie I have yet to see, but I’m blown away when I see screen shots from the movie and how she transforms into her character.  After seeing her in Julie and Julia, I now look at pictures of the real Julia Childs and think she’s the actress.  Meryl Streep is the real Julia.  It’s all so confusing.

For my next caricature, I’m going to tackle Gary Oldman.

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Glenn Close Caricature Sketch

Here’s a sketch of Oscar nominee Glenn Close.  She’s up for Actress in a Leading Role for her movie Albert Nobbs.  I haven’t seen the movie, but I know that with her, just like fellow nominee Meryl Streep, it’s a great performance.

Soon after starting the caricature of Mrs. Close, I found myself quickly emphasizing the mouth.  When she smiles it literally appears to go from ear to ear.

I hope everyone has a great weekend.

Since I already mentioned Meryl Streep, I guess I’ll sketch her for Monday’s caricature.

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Brad Pitt Caricature Sketch

I usually don’t like to draw my caricatures from a straight on view.  I like more of a 3/4 view where I can play with animating the character a little more.  With a straight on view, I feel like the drawing can get a little flat.  It can lose some of the great characteristics of the face like the way a nose is structured, or the contour of the head that is found in a 3/4 view.  There are exceptions though, and that was the case when I started drawing my sketch of Brad Pitt.  For Brad, it was all about the jawline and the eyes.  Oh yeah, and the long, scraggly hair style he’s sporting these days.

The reason I went with a straight on view this time was the shape that evolved when drawing the jawline.  Brad has a really strong jaw.  I know that I could show that in another view, but what I liked here was the way the hair helped to accentuate the shape.  Also, from this view I felt it was a great way to show off the half opened smile and the slightly raised left eyebrow that are often seen in his expressions.

Tomorrow’s Oscar contender is Glenn Close.

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George Clooney Caricature Sketch

I’m sure many people who draw caricatures will agree with me when I say that drawing someone who has attractive features is so much harder than drawing someone who has, shall we say, unique features.  When someone has distinctive attributes, such as big, bushy eyebrows like Martin Scorsese, or a recognizable hairstyle like Conan O’Brien, it’s easier to launch an illustration from those areas.  When you have someone like George Clooney, who by most standards is an attractive man with handsome features, it’s more of a struggle.  He was, after all, named “Sexy’s Man Alive” a couple of times by People magazine.  If I’m going to draw his caricature by pushing and pulling facial features, how am I going to do it so he remains instantly recognizable?

With all my caricatures, I have to look at various photographs of the person for inspiration.  I scour the images looking for something that will stand out and give me the creative jump start that I’m looking for.  It could be a hairstyle, a shape to the nose, the way someone smiles, or a turn of the head that will show an overall shape that I hadn’t seen before.  With George (I feel like I can call him George now), I couldn’t find that inspiration in photographs and went to YouTube to find an interview with him.  I wanted to see his gestures and his mannerisms.  I’ve seen his movies and I’ve seen interviews with him, but what was it that made him recognizable to me aside from knowing who he is?

I started with his hair.  He has perfect hair.  It’s perfectly cut, perfectly combed and hardly thinning at all.  Damn him!  I knew that wasn’t going to be enough.  I moved to studying the overall shape of the head and one thing stood out to me . . . the chin.  There it was in all its glory.  A large, protuberant, Superman-esque chin.  After drawing that, I began to get inspired at what was happening with the caricature.  Next it was on to the eyes, because if the eyes aren’t right, it’s hard to pull off a convincing caricature.  I noticed that his slant slightly, really squint when he smiles, are set wider apart and are topped by dark, bushy eyebrows.  Wow, I hope I’m not going to give him a complex.  Putting all these pieces of the puzzle together, I really saw George coming together, yet one thing was still missing.  It sort of looked like him, but something still wasn’t right.  Watching some more of the interview, it hit me.  It was the tilt of the head that I needed.  That little gesture took the caricature from just a drawing that looked like George Clooney to one that made it feel like George Clooney.

After another spin of the big Oscar wheel, tomorrow’s caricature will be Brad Pitt.

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Martin Scorsese Caricature Sketch

I’ve been neglecting my sketches lately as I’ve been consumed with other projects and just haven’t had the time.  Truthfully, I really need to make the time.  Sitting down to draw when there aren’t any pressures of deadlines and just for the sake of drawing, is a great way for me to relax and clear my head.  It’s my therapy.

Today’s sketch idea came from my wife.  We were sitting around watching an interview on TV with Martin Scorsese.  As most of you probably know, he’s up for an Oscar this year for Directing Hugo.  I think he’s a great director, and from the interviews I’ve seen of him lately, he’s seems like quite the character.  A perfect subject for a caricature study.

After finishing my sketch of Mr. Scorsese, I realized that last year I looked to the Oscar’s for subject ideas.  I think I’ll try that again this year.  So, after spinning the big Oscar wheel, it looks like George Clooney will be my subject for tomorrow’s post.

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